Mail Call – New Sawyer Select Water Filter & Outdoor Vitals MummyPod Hammock Sleep System

In this episode of Sintax77’s Mail Call, I check out the new Sawyer Select foam water filter, and a hammock camping sleep system by Outdoor Vitals called the StormLoft Mummy Pod, along with their netless hammock system with whoopie slings.

I also open some viewer mail and discuss Permethrin vs Picaridin vs Deet for tick and mosquito treatment of backpacking and camping gear.

Links and Info for the Sawyer Select Water Filtration System

  • Official Sawyer Select Filters Webpage Link
  • The three Select systems reduce chemicals down to 0.5 parts per billion (up to 40 times lower than the EPA’s maximum recommended level) and reduce pesticides down to 0.01 parts per billion (400 times lower than the EPA’s maximum).
  • The Select S2 and Select S3 models go even further, purifying contaminated water from suspect sources.
  • Select S2 filters out 99.99% of viruses.
  • Select S3 filters out 99.99% of viruses and reduces heavy metals such as copper, arsenic, and mercury down to 0.5 parts per billion (up to 260 times lower than the EPA’s maximum).
  • Weight: 9.25 oz total for bottle with foam filter and hollow fiber membrane filter attachment.

Links and Manufacturer’s specs for the Outdoor Vitals 15° StormLOFT Down Mummy Pod

  • Official SormLOFT MummyPod Webpage Link
  • Easily switches from use as a mummy sleeping bag to a pod system to fully insulate a hammock!
  • Patented footbox allows hammock to run straight out of the bottom of the bag and seal, or zip it up for use on the ground and insulating baffles keep your feet warm!
  • Redesigned shoulder baffles seal cold air out and add additional comfort!
  • StormLOFT™ 800 fill power hydrophobic down provides premium performance in both loft, warmth and dealing with adverse weather conditions!
  • NEW YKK Anti Snag Zipper makes it virtually impossible to damage your sleeping bag while zipping it up. It also provides easier zipper flow making it a breeze to get in and out!
  • Vertical baffles keep the down locked into place both on the hammock and on the ground.
  • Included suspension system keeps the bag from sagging or moving when using it on the hammock
  • Extra shoulder room (grid) keep the bag extremely comfortable and roomy.
  • Outdoor Vitals Lifetime Warranty: Here at Outdoor Vitals we believe in standing behind the craftsmanship and quality of our products. Anything that was our fault, we fix so you can feel confident that you’re getting exactly what you paid for!

Links and Manufacturer’s specs for the Outdoor Vitals Ultralight Solo Hammock

  • Official Outdoor Vitals Ultralight Solo Hammock Webpage
  • Weight: 14 oz (finished model may be 13 oz)
  • Hammock & Carabiners: 9.5 oz (finished model may be 8.5 oz)
  • Suspension System: 4.5 oz
  • Unfolded size: 9′ x 4′
  • Compact size: 7″ x 4.5″
  • 7/64 inch dyneema™ whoopie sling
  • 1 inch thick by 6 foot long double looped polyester tree strap
  • 40D ripstop nylon fabric
  • Triple stitched
  • Wire gate high grade aluminum carabiner
  • Rated to 300 lbs when used properly

Mail Call – What is this thing? | HangTime Hook

In this episode of Sintax77’s Mail Call, I open a package containing an item that I can’t quite figure out at first…

At first glance, I could at least devise that it was some sort of hammock camping gear accessory.  Specifically what it was though, was confusing the heck out of me to be honest.

All that written on the envelope was a face book page, which cleared things up pretty quickly.   https://www.facebook.com/myhangtimehook/

Apparently it’s an early production run prototype for an accessory that allows you to easily hang your cellphone from your hammock ridgeline.  It also appears to be useful for mounting other items such as a light or USB charger as well, by using the various attachment points or the main clamp.

HangTime Hammock Ridgeline Cellphone Holder weight: 52 grams (1.83 oz)

Olight HS2 Headlamp for Running & Hiking – Review

A Review of the Olight HS2 Headlamp for Running & Hiking.

In this gear video I go over my personal experiences with using the Olight HS2 rechargeable headlamp system, specs, features, and operational procedures to access the Olight H2R Nova’s light modes and charging functions. As a backpacker more so than a runner, I also go over my thoughts and experiences with using this as a running headlamp vs a hiking and camping headlamp.

HS2 Specs, as per the Manufacturer

  • Beam Distance Max: 279 feet / 85 meters
  • Max Performance (lumens): 400
  • Charge type: Micro-USB
  • Compatible Batteries: Customized LiPo Battery
  • Light Intensity (candela): 1,800
  • Light Form: Wide/broad hotspot. Perfect for up close illumination.
  • Lens / Reflector Type: TIR bead lens (wide/broad beam)
  • Mode Operation: Side Switch
  • Size Factor: Small size (Car key / Zippo Lighter)
  • Series: Series H (Headlamps, Multitasking)

Unique Characteristics

  • Can be powered directly from any USB power source – never run out of battery.
  • Dual LED system for long range and up-close wide illumination.
  • Audible beep at 10% battery capacity to alert the user to charge.
  • Compact and lightweight at only 4 ounces.

Lighting Levels

  • Dual Beam High: 400 lumens , 2 hours 12 minutes
  • Dual Beam Low: 100 lumens , 9 hours
  • Single Beam High (wide or spot): 200 lumens , 4 hours 30 minutes
  • Single Beam Low (wide or spot): 50 lumens , 18 hours
  • Moon 1 lumens Cool White / 1 lumens – Neutral White – 45 days
  • Strobe: No
  • SOS / BEACON: Yes

Technical Characteristics

  • Waterproof: IPX4
  • Weight: 4.06 oz , 115 grams
  • Length: 24mm / 0.94 in
  • Head Diameter:  23mm / 0.91 in
  • Body Diameter: 45mm / 1.77 in
  • LED: Cree XH-G2
  • Use: EDC, car, camping, fishing, household, general use, fishing, climbing, cave exploration, outdoor activities, house activitie

Package Contents

  • Flashlight Olight HS2 x 1
  • Rechargeable  2000mAh 3.7V Lipo x 1
  • head strap x 1
  • Pouch x 1
  • Replacement Cable Clip x 2
  • 1.5-meter Micro-USB Cable
  • instruction manual x 1

Other items Seen / Discussed in the Video

Backpacking Gear for Hammock Camping – Which Items to Buy First?

A discussion on deciding which backpacking gear items to buy / upgrade first when first getting started with hammock camping.

A viewer, Chuck C., recently sent me the following question:

“I have been buying my gear spread out so the wife won’t kill me. Rank these in the order you would buy:

  • Cuben Fiber Tarp
  • Down Under Quilt
  • Down Top Quilt
  • Hammock
  • Backpack

In the video I try to answer this question as well as get some discussion going on the topic of hammock camping gear in general.  Which items would you upgrade or buy first?

Two Hammocks, One Bug Net – Double Dutch and Birds Nest Bugnet Systems

Checking out two bugnet options for double hammock camping – The Bird’s Nest (for use with any two hammocks), and the Double Dutch Bugnet (for use with the Chameleon Hammock), both made by Dutchware Gear.

Both of these bugnet systems are designed specifically for use with double hammock, spreader bar systems.  i.e. Putting two hammocks on a single pair of trees for use with the same tarp. While I showed the Beetle buckle suspension (stock suspension that came with my Chameleon Hammock) for use with the spreader bar, there are several suspension options that would work with this setup as well (links below.

Gear Seen and Links for More Info

Two other suspension options (not shown) that would work with the spreader bar

Tarp mentioned in the video for use with the double hammock setups

Investing in a Cuben Fiber Tarp – Thoughts & Considerations for Hammock Camping

A discussion on Cuben Fiber Tarps for Hammock Camping (specifically, the Hammock Gear Cuben Hex Tarp models, both with & without doors).

I recently received a message from a viewer asking for feedback / advice regarding the potential purchase of an ultralight cuben fiber tarp for hammock camping and backpacking, as well as the pros and cons related to some of the options available for these tarps.

Below are his two main questions, which Mike and I used as a jumping off point for our discussion on these tarps.  While our reference point throughout the video is HG Cuben Hex Tarp line of tarps (also know as Dyneema Tarps), this discussion is pretty much applicable to cuben tarps in general as well as cuben fiber’s properties as a backpacking gear material.

Lyle’s Questions & Talking Points

  • I’m considering purchasing the Hammock Gear Cuban Fiber Tarp, but given the price I thought I’d ask some people who own it a couple of questions.
  • 1) 11ft vs 12ft
    I have an 11ft hammock (Warbonnet – Blackbird XLX)… I’m leaning towards the 12ft length, only because I like the idea of greater coverage.
  • 2) Doors vs no-doors
    This is my biggest question … if I should order it with doors…or can get away without them?I’m primarily a 3 season camper…BUT, I would like to do more winter camping. When would you have preferred a “door” version of this tarp vs. a “non-door” version?
  • I’ve seen you use this tarp in several of your videos.  Is there anything you’d do/choose differently if you were purchasing this tarp again?

Other Topics Discussed

  • Cuben Fiber Cost
  • The advantage of cuben fiber’s lower volume in addition to the more obvious weight savings.
  • Cuben fiber strength & durability considerations for hammock camping.
  • Tarp ridgeline length and finding the right trees.
  • Tarp ridgeline length vs doors for rain and snow camping situations.

Tarps Seen in the Video (all weights are tarp only, no lines etc)

Hammocks Seen in the Video